Speakers


Keynote Speakers

 

Mayor Mike SavageMayor Mike Savage, Halifax Regional Municipality

Mike Savage was elected Mayor of Halifax Regional Municipality on October 20, 2012. Mayor Savage ran on a platform to make Halifax the most liveable, entrepreneurial and inclusive city in the country, principles that continue to shape his work at City Hall and in the community. He is an active member of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Big City Mayors’ Caucus and a strong voice in support of local economic development, immigration, social equity, and infrastructure investment. In October 2015, Mayor Savage was selected by his counterparts from across the country to co-chair the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Syrian refugee response task force. The role allowed him to draw on his long political experience to help draw cities together to share best practices in response to the Syrian refugee and resettlement.  In the fall of 2015, Mayor Savage became president of the World Energy Cities partnership, an international organization of cities with significant energy sector interests. In March 2016, he was honoured as a Modern Maker of Canada by the Canadian Institute on Governance during a ceremony recognizing the growing role of civic leaders in driving the economic prosperity for the country.  Prior to his election as Mayor, Mike Savage served as Member of Parliament for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour from 2004 until 2011, during which time he played a national role as Official Opposition Critic for Human Resources, Social Development and Status of Persons with Disabilities.  Mayor Savage has also had a career in business as General Manager of S. Cunard and Co., Director of Sales and Marketing for Nova Scotia Power Inc., Vice President at Knightsbridge Robertson Surrette, and Vice President at M5 Communications.  Mayor Savage has demonstrated community leadership in social, health and cultural organizations, as a board member for the IWK Health Centre and Neptune Theatre, as a former President of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia, and through his involvement with Junior Achievement, The Red Cross, Canadian National Institute for the Blind and the United Way. Mayor Savage and his wife Darlene have two children, Emma and Conor, and continue to make their home in Dartmouth where Mayor Savage grew up and attended school before graduating from Dalhousie University.

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Photo-Jean Andrey[2]Jean Andrey, Dean, Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo

Jean has been with the Faculty of Environment since 1989.  She was appointed Dean in 2015, having previously served as Interim Dean, Associate Dean [Graduate Studies], and Associate Chair [Graduate Studies] for the Department of Geography and Environmental Management. Dr. Andrey’s research focuses on safe and sustainable transportation systems.  She has published nearly 100 articles, book chapters, conference proceedings and technical reports.  She has won the Distinguished Teacher Award and the Award of Excellence in Graduate Supervision at the University of Waterloo.  Dr. Andrey is Past-President of the Canadian Association of Geographers and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Dr. Andrey is Past-President of the Canadian Association of Geographers and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

 

bob_bjerkeBob Bjerke, Chief Planner, Halifax Regional Municipality 

Bob is the Chief Planner and Director of Planning and Development for Halifax Regional Municipality. In the two years Bob has held this role he has made, and continues to make significant changes through a successful department renewal process. With over 15 years’ experience in municipal leadership and professional planning positions, he has worked in the private sector, Federal and now municipal government. Bob holds a Masters Degree in Planning from York University and MA in Political Studies from the University of Saskatchewan. He has lived and worked across Canada, in Regina as the Director of Planning, and as Director of Housing for the City of Edmonton until his move to Nova Scotia. Bob has served on the CIP National Council, the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association Board and is a past President of the Saskatchewan Professional Planners.

 

Andy FillmoreAndy Fillmore, Honourable Member of Parliament for Halifax, House of Commons, Ottawa

Andy has been an urban planner and community builder in the private, public, and academic sectors for twenty years. As Halifax’s first Manager of Urban Design, Andy’s career has included initiatives like the new Halifax Central Library and “HRM by Design,” the downtown Halifax plan. His leadership on HRM by Design, in particular, has seen development activity in downtown Halifax increase by over forty times. Andy also served as Director and Associate Professor at the Dalhousie University’s School of Planning. Andy attended Acadia University and holds graduate degrees from Harvard University and Dalhousie University. On October 19th, 2015, Andy was elected Member of Parliament for Halifax. He serves as the Chair of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development. On May 2016, Andy introduced his first private member’s motion, M-45, which if passed would require greenhouse gas emissions analyses be undertaken for infrastructure projects seeking federal funding. The motion is scheduled for a vote in autumn 2016.  Andy grew up in Halifax and lives in the city with his wife Sarah and their daughter.

 

John GodfreyThe Honourable John Godfrey, Special Advisor for Climate Change, Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

John Godfrey is Special Advisor for Climate Change to the Government of Ontario and Chair of Ontario’s (CAG) Climate Action Group. John has had an extensive and accomplished career dedicated to public service that spans over 30 years. He was first elected to the federal House of Commons as the member of parliament for Don Valley West in 1993. He was re-elected four times, holding the position until 2008. From 2003-04, Godfrey was the parliamentary secretary to the prime minister and from 2004-06, he served in cabinet as minister of state for Infrastructure and Communities. In that role, he was responsible for overseeing the distribution of $5.6 billion for strategic, municipal, rural and border infrastructure programs. Prior to being elected to Parliament, Godfrey served as vice-president of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He was also editor of the Financial Post for four years and spent 14 years in academia, holding various positions at the University of Kings College, including associate professor, president and vice-chancellor. Godfrey has been involved in many community and public service organizations, including president of the Council for Canadian Unity, a board of directors member for the National Film Board, a co-founder of the Committee of Concerned Nova Scotians for Justice and a board of directors member for Pollution Probe. Most recently, Godfrey was the headmaster of the Toronto French School. He has a bachelor of arts (honours) in modern history and English literature from the University of Toronto, a master’s degree in modern history from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. in modern history from Oxford University. The Honourable John Godfrey and members of the climate action group bring exceptional wisdom, experience and vision to help develop a forward-looking strategy and action plan that will help Ontario effectively fight climate change and foster a prosperous, low-carbon economy. Our fight against climate change will benefit from these leaders and their passion for helping build a better future for our planet and Ontario.

 

Paul Kovacs, Founder and Executive Director, Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction

kovacsPaul is Founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction, Adjunct Research Professor at Western University, and CEO of the Property and Casualty Insurance Compensation Corporation.  Since 1996 Paul has been a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world’s leading forum for the study of climate issues. The Panel won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize “for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change”. He is Canada’s leading authority on insurance and climate extremes, and has been a contributing author to numerous international and Canadian reports on reducing the risk of loss from earthquakes, flood and severe wind to achieve disaster resilience.  He has written more than 200 publications and articles and is a passionate champion for insurance, disaster resilience and adaptation to climate extremes.  Paul chairs a number of working groups and is also a member of a number of Boards and Advisory Panels. He is a proud husband and father, with a growing collection of bow ties.

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CharlotteMCharlotte MacAlister, Senior Program Officer, Climate Change, International Development Research Centre

Charlotte MacAlister is a Senior Program Officer, Climate Change, for Canada’s IDRC. She has been instrumental in the development of the Centre’s rural and urban climate adaptation programming and leads work on integration of climate science into policy. Before joining IDRC Charlotte worked for the International Water Management Institute in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Charlotte has a BSc Environmental Studies, Manchester Metropolitan University, MSc Irrigation and PhD Hydrological Modelling, Newcastle University. She applies her background in hydrological and water resource modelling to support the integration of climate science into policy frameworks, from the local to international level.

 

Megan Meaney headshotMegan Meaney, Director, ICLEI Canada

Megan is recognized by cities across Canada as an authority on municipal sustainability. She has been with ICLEI since 1999, over which time she has held many roles in strategic energy planning, climate mitigation and adaptation, biodiversity, as well as sustainability management. As Director of ICLEI Canada, Megan oversees the governance of the non-profit organization. She holds responsibility for strategic planning, partnership development, and financial systems. The favourite part of her job comes when she talks to ICLEI members; learning about how they are handling the day-to-day nature of the ongoing quest for sustainability in their community.

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shannon miedemaShannon Miedema, Energy and Environment Program Manager, Halifax Regional Municipality

Shannon Miedema is the Energy and Environment Program Manager for the Halifax Regional Municipality.  Shannon has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies and Earth Systems Science from Queen’s University, a Master of Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Kings College. After five years in environmental consulting, she joined the municipality in 2009 as an Environmental Performance Officer focused on climate change mitigation and adaptation. Shannon plans to continue using her passion, education and experience to lead Halifax towards increased resiliency and sustainability for the betterment of our community, economy and environment.

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shawna peddle

Shawna Peddle, Director, Partners for Action

Shawna has 17 years of experience in the environmental field, managing environmental assessment and aboriginal and public engagement programs for infrastructure and energy projects throughout Ontario. That experience allowed her to engage with local municipal governments, aboriginal communities, and residents on a number of often contentious projects. As the Director for Partners for Action, Shawna is responsible for strategic oversight of all P4A programs (events, research, reports, etc.), fundraising, managing relationships with stakeholders, funders and research partners, and promoting the network.

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Barbara Turley-McIntyreBarbara Turley-McIntyre, Vice President, Sustainability and Citizenship, The Co-operators

Barbara Turley-McIntyre started her business career as an independent insurance broker in Montreal and in 1997 joined The Co-operators Group Limited, a $42 billion Canadian-owned, multi-product insurance and financial services company. She managed underwriting teams in property and casualty and held responsible for community and shareholder relations. Presently, Barbara leads the enterprise-wide integration of the Sustainability Vision, Policy and Strategy with responsibility for producing the annual Integrated Report and carbon management programs.  This also includes responsibility for The Co-operators community programs, including The Co-operators Foundation.  Barabara hold a Masters in Environment and Business from the University of Waterloo and a Chartered Insurance Professional designation. She is a Sessional Lecturer at the University of Waterloo, Faculty of the Environment. Her volunteering activities include organizations that advance sustainable development – Director with The Natural Step Canada and a Board member of the United Nations Environment Program – Finance Initiative Global Steering Committee and the Principles of Sustainable Insurance.

 

Gino3_CroppedGino Van Begin, Secretary General, ICLEI Global

Gino has served as ICLEI Regional Director for Europe since 2002 and as Deputy Secretary General since 2007.  Gino has consistently and comprehensively worked over the last 12 years towards ensuring ICLEI’s quality as a responsible, professional, non for profit, local government organization in Europe and worldwide. He has been ICLEI’s Chief Negotiator on local climate actions and was instrumental in organizing various major events, such as the European Sustainable Cities and Towns Conferences which have grown to become the major sustainability rendezvous for local governments in Europe.  Before joining ICLEI in 2000, Gino worked as advisor and as Team Leader at the EU-funded Environmental Centres for Administration and Technology in Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg, Russia for seven years.  From 1987 to 1993, he was a legal advisor at the European Commission’s DG Environment, General Secretariat and DG External relations. He also worked at the Cabinet of the Vice-President of the Government of Flanders and Minister of Economy, Small Business and Energy. Trained as a lawyer from the University of Brussels, Gino speaks Dutch, French, English, German and Russian.

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Program Speakers – Click on a speaker to open their biography

Lori Ackerman, Mayor, Fort St. John, BC

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Lori was born in Manitoba and raised in all four western provinces. She has lived in the Peace region since 1980 and in Fort St. John since 1988. She is the mother of 3 children and step-mom of 3.  Married to Andy and together they have 10 grandchildren. Prior to getting involved in politics, Lori was very active in nonprofit organizations.  Included in these are: Soccer, Scouts, United Way, Rotary, Chamber of Commerce, and Homeless shelter society.

Lori was first elected to City Council in 2005 and started serving as a Director for the Peace River Regional District in 2006. She was honoured to take on the Mayor’s seat in November 2011. Lori’s background is in marketing, economic development and small business counseling and she is a graduate of the Institute of Corporate Directors’ Governance Essentials Program and is presently completing the final course of the Northern Lights College Business Management Diploma program.

As the Family Service Director of the Salvation Army in FSJ from 1997 – 2002, Lori was instrumental in creating the City’s first staffed homeless shelter, 5 day/week soup kitchen and larger foodbank.  She became a Foodsafe instructor to ensure the volunteers and staff were properly trained for their positions. Lori was offered the position of Executive Director of Sci-Tech North, (the Science, Innovation and Technology council for NEBC), and bid farewell to the Salvation Army.  With this position, Lori worked with entrepreneurs and innovators in North East BC to assist them in taking their idea from “concept to commercialization”.  It is from this experience that Lori has seen proof that BC can harvest its natural resources and with the use of innovative BC born technology, doing it more efficiently, effectively and leave a lighter footprint.

In recognition of her community involvement in 2002 and 2012, Lori received the Queen’s Jubilee Medal and in 2005, she received the Silver Acorn for her distinguished service to Scouting. Lori was named one of the Top 35 Most Influential Women in BC in February of 2016.  She represents the community on many local, regional and provincial boards and committees.

Session:

Moving Towards Alternatives: Green Building Practices and Renewable Energy: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Small Town Success Stories: Lessons Learned from Small and Rural Municipalities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Travis Allan, Partner, DeMarco Allan LLP

Travis AllenTravis J. Allan is a partner at DeMarco Allan LLP. Travis advises on corporate and commercial legal matters, climate change and land use policy, carbon credit development and sale, renewable energy, electric vehicle policy and a variety of regulatory matters including energy and privacy.  Travis has written and spoken extensively about changes to land use planning law and policy that can support climate change adaptation and mitigation, focusing on promoting location-efficient and transit-oriented development and the preservation and cultivation of natural capital. He recently co-authored a report for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Economy on intersections between climate change mitigation and adaptation and regional land use planning.  Before joining DeMarco Allan LLP, Travis practiced at one of the world’s largest law firms in New York, NY focusing on project finance and corporate restructuring. Travis is a member of the Ontario and New York bars. He serves on the boards of the Climate Change Lawyers Network (as co-chair) and Project Neutral (as acting-chair) and formerly served as a governor of the Ontario Land Trust Alliance.

Session:

What’s Measured – Using Indicators to Measure Progress and Change Courses: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Elizabeth Atkinson, Director, Strategic Partnerships, Interdisciplinary Centre for Climate Change, University of Waterloo

Elizabeth AtkinsonElizabeth Atkinson is the Director of Strategic Partnerships with the Interdisciplinary Centre for Climate Change at the University of Waterloo. She is currently on secondment from Natural Resources Canada to help UWaterloo secure key partnerships with industry, government and research institutions in its bid for a Network of Centres of Excellence on climate adaptation.  At NRCan, Elizabeth was the Senior Policy Manager at the Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division where she helped shape Canada’s adaptation policy and Natural Resources Canada’s adaptation programming since 2003. She is the former chair of the Adaptation Platform Economics Working Group and Vice-chair of the Adaptation Platform Plenary. Elizabeth has also advised numerous adaptation initiatives including those of the former National Round Table on the Environment and Economy, the Conference Board of Canada and the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada.

Session:

Crossing Paths: Building Partnerships to Improve Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Gordon Beal, Vice-President, Research, Guidance and Support, Chartered Professional Accountants Canada

Gord leads a technical team that produces research, guidance, and thought leadership in a broad spectrum of professional areas.

Prior to joining CPA Canada, Gord held a variety of senior financial and operational roles in the private business sector. He has also run his own consulting practice in business advisory services and was a senior learning and change consultant with the Ontario Ministry of Finance. His career began in professional services with Clarkson Gordon and Ernst & Young, supporting private and public companies. He also has extensive experience in not for profit governance.

Since joining CPA Canada in 2004, Gord has led a number of large scale change projects in Knowledge Development, Education Services, and Standards implementation support. More recently, he provided leadership for CPA Canada’s project on Climate Change Adaption in partnership with Natural Resources Canada. Since 2013, Gord has represented CPA Canada on NRCan’s National Climate Change Adaptation Platform Plenary.  His core expertise is in organizational adaption and resilience which has been a key element of his role in leading CPA Canada’s extensive work in climate change adaption and the role of CPAs in this field.

Session:

Role of the Private Sector in Building resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00 Engaging the “Unusual Suspects” in Canadian Adaptation: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Nathalie Beauvais, Climate Lead and Adjunct Professor, Kleinfelder

Nathalie Beauvais_let Michael Houle know if a better resolution picture is neededNathalie is a senior member of Kleinfelder’s sustainability practice where she currently manages the team of scientists, academics and sustainability experts conducting the City of Cambridge Climate Change Preparedness and Resiliency (CCPR) Plan, the Washington DC Climate Change Adaptation Plan and the Statewide Resilience Master Plan for the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM). An author and speaker on comprehensive planning, sustainability and climate change, Ms. Beauvais presents at conferences nationally and internationally.  She has been teaching on Climate Change at Northeastern University and at Wentworth Institute of Technology. Ms. Beauvais holds a Master Degree in Architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design and a Baccalaureate in Architecture from l’Université Laval, Québec, Canada.

Session:

The Data Divide: Working with Data to Enhance Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Andy Binns, Professor, University of Guelph

binns,andrew-0025Prof. Andrew Binns is an Assistant Professor in Water Resources Engineering at the University of Guelph. Andy received his PhD in Civil Engineering from Queen’s University in 2012.  Prior to his present position at UofG Andy worked in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Western Ontario and as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Integrative Biology at UofG. Some of Andy’s present research includes topics in the areas of urban flooding and the effects of floods on urban infrastructure, stormwater management and low impact development, river and stream restoration, and hydrodynamic processes in large lakes.

Session:

Assisting Municipalities in Combatting Extreme Rainfall: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Jeff Birchall, Assistant Professor, University of Alberta

Prior to joining the Urban and Regional Planning Program, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta, Jeff lectured in the School of Urban and Regional Planning, Ryerson University, and in the College of Business and Economics, University of Canterbury, where he completed his PhD and was the recipient of the prestigious Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fellowship.

Jeff’s research focuses around the theme coastal community climate resilience, which broadly explores how communities confront climate change and adapt to the emerging challenges imposed on them due to increases in temperature, more extreme weather events and a rise in sea level. In particular, Jeff’s work explores the decision dynamics around climate change adaptation policies/ planning and actions implementation. Jeff’s research focuses on coastal communities in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the United States.

Session:

Small Town Success Stories: Lessons Learned from Small and Rural Municipalities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Jeanne Bourque, Planner, The Municipality of the District of West Hants

Session:

Lessons learned from the Municipal Climate Chance Action Plan Process in Nova Scotia: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Isabelle Charron, Climate Scenario Specialist, Ouranos

Isabelle Charron joined the Climate Scenarios and Services group at Ouranos in 2010, where her main role is to facilitate the transfer and understanding of climate scenarios and climate information to different actors in vulnerability, impacts and adaptation research programs. Notably, she has contributed to numerous VI&A projects in forestry, energy demand, and the northern environment. Most recently, she authored a guidebook on climate scenarios, which aims to help decision-makers better understand and evaluate their needs in terms of climate information. This document has proven to be a valuable resource to actors new to the field of climate change adaptation. She also contributed her expertise toward the publication of Ouranos’ synthesis on climate knowledge in Quebec, published in 2014.  Isabelle holds a Doctorate in forest ecology from the University of Calgary and a post-doctorate degree in fluvial geomorphology from the University of Montreal. She has taught natural-resource management at Concordia University for a number of years at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Session:

The Data Divide: Working with Data to Enhance Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Lucy Cummings, Executive Director, Faith and the Common Good

Session:

Engaging the “Unusual Suspects” in Canadian Adaptation: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Kareina D’Souza, Graduate Student, Dalhousie University

Kareina obtained her Honours Bachelor of Science (Zoology) from the University of Guelph in 2014. After graduation, she was a member of the husbandry SCUBA diver team at the Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada. During her time as a diver at the aquarium, she also completed a thesis project working with the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario on a project examining freshwater mussels DNA barcodes. Her thesis work was expanded after it was completed after which she worked to refine the protocols for the non-invasive sampling of freshwater mussels in Ontario.  Kareina is currently completing her Master’s of Resource and Environmental Management (MREM) at the Dalhousie School for Resource and Environmental Studies. The MREM program consists of multidisciplinary coursework, an internship and a project report. As part of the program Kareina collaborated on a semester long research report on Climate Change Adaptation in Nova Scotia and is currently working with the World Wildlife Fund as an Oceans Research Intern.

Session:

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada: Issues and Responses: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Amanda Dean, VP Atlantic, Insurance Bureau of Canada

amandadeanAmanda is known for her consensus-building leadership and strategic stakeholder engagement. As Vice-President for Insurance Bureau of Canada’s Atlantic region, she advocates and is responsible for eliciting positive change and sound public policy on key priorities for the private home, auto and business insurance sector.  Amanda also directs stakeholder and member initiatives and represents member companies’ concerns while collaborating with all levels of government on shared and strategic industry objectives such as sustainable auto insurance, balanced regulation and adaptation to severe weather.  In previous roles, Amanda worked closely with the Deputy Premier of Nova Scotia (and former minister responsible for Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal) and the Minister of National Defence. Her responsibilities included communications, issues management and intergovernmental relations.  Amanda holds a bachelor’s degree in public relations from Mount Saint Vincent University (MSVU) and a master’s degree in business administration from Saint Mary’s University. She is a member of the Board of Directors for MEOPAR (Marine Environmental Observation Prediction and Response Network) and MSVU’s Board of Governors and Advancement and External Relations Committee. An avid community leader, Amanda has volunteered with Symphony Nova Scotia, has served on the YWCA Halifax Board of Directors, and has lectured on government relations at MSVU.

Session:

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada: Issues and Responses: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Michael Dean, Climate and Energy Project Coordinator, ICLEI Canada

As Climate and Energy Planner for ICLEI Canada, Michael is responsible for providing support to ICLEI’s Community Energy Planning activities by way of GIS and mapping expertise, data collection, analysis, and research. Michael delivers technical activities related to the Partners for Climate Protection program, including protocol support, technical inquiries, and milestone reviews. In addition he assists in managing and implementing emissions inventories and local action planning projects with local governments. Michael has a Master of Science in Planning from the University of Toronto, as well as a Master of Arts in History from the University of British Columbia and is a LEED Green Associate.

Session:

Finding the Synergies Between Low-carbon and Resilient Communities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Jennifer Dougherty, Manager, Water Quality Protection, Credit Valley Conservation Authority

Jennifer Dougherty is a Professional Engineer and is the Manager of Water Quality Protection at Credit Valley Conservation Authority (CVC). She has a Master’s degree from the University of Waterloo in wastewater treatment. She has worked at CVC for the past 12 years and has been involved in a variety of water resources protection studies, including designing and managing water quality monitoring programs, water quality plan review of proposals regarding land use change through Environmental Assessments and Certificate of Approvals with a focus on assimilative capacities of the Credit River.   She currently manages a complex stormwater performance monitoring program & team in charge of measuring and documenting the performance of a suite of green infrastructure facilities including the compliance, inspection, maintenance and tracking long term life cycle costs.

Session:

Crossing Paths: Building Partnerships to Improve Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Mitchell Downton, Graduate Student, Dalhousie University

Mitchell Downton obtained his Bachelor’s of Science with Honours in Zoology and Political Science (Double Major) from the University of Guelph in 2015. During his undergraduate tenure, he conducted an Honours thesis on the decay rate of biological hydroxyurea in amphibians. As well, he completed a summer field course in Yellowknife, NT that showcased to him a steadily changing climate in the Arctic region. His experience in taking both Political Science and Biology courses has given him a unique perspective in bridging the gap between science and policy.

Mitchell is currently completing his Masters of Resource and Environmental Management at Dalhousie University. The program consists of multidisciplinary coursework, a summer internship, and a semester-long project report. Mitchell was employed at Atlantic Gold Corporation as an environmental analyst during the summer, and in regards to the project report he recently collaborated working on climate change adaptation in Nova Scotia coastal zones.

Session:

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada: Issues and Responses: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Peter Duinker, Professor, Dalhousie University

Peter Duinker is a professor of resource and environmental studies at Dalhousie University. He has degrees in agriculture, forest ecology, and forest management/environmental assessment. He teaches and researches a wide range of topics, most of which deal with forests and environmental assessment.  Recent urban-forest research projects include forest restoration in Point Pleasant Park, urban-forest values in Canadian cities, and forest adaptation to climate change. With his students and research associates, along with city planners, Peter played a key role in developing Halifax’s Urban Forest Master Plan. He continues to provide research and monitoring services during plan implementation. At his home in central Halifax, Peter is gradually removing the Norway-maple canopy and replacing it with native species associated with Acadian old-growth forests.  Peter lives in Halifax with his wife Maggie, and stops working now and then to enjoy choral singing, home-brewing, photographing trees, home renovations, cycle-touring, and a bit of golf.

Session:

Nature as a Vital Tool for Canadian Community Resilience: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

City Walkabout Study Tour Leader: Wednesday, September 14, 9:00-12:00

Peter Duncan, Manager, Infrastructure Planning, Halifax Regional Municipality

Session:

Innovative Practices in Paying for Stormwater Management: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Kathy Edwards, Wellfield Protection Officer, City of Fredericton

Kathy is an Engineering Technician and the Wellfield Protection Officer for the City of Fredericton.  Having spent 9 years dedicated to implementing a drinking water protection program for the City’s groundwater supply, Kathy has turned her attention to providing support to the City’s Senior Design Engineer and Senior Development Engineer.  Her tasks include approving building permits for engineering requirements and coordinating the Capital Construction Plan review processes.  She remains keenly active in drinking water protection, acting as the store of information for the City’s Wellfield Protected Area Designation Order as well as providing advice on a variety of new issues that might spring up.  Kathy also acts as an advisor on contaminated sites issues and is currently leading the City’s participation in the ICLEI Climate Change Adaptation Initiative.  A hard working City employee by day, Kathy is also an avid knitter and canine supervisory advisor and biosolids collector to one retired US racing greyhound, and two Galgos & a Podenco from Spain.

Session:

From Planning to Action: Bridging the Implementation Gap: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Elizabeth English, Associate Professor, University of Waterloo

Session:

Transformational Versus Incremental Adaptation – Can We All Move Light-years Ahead?: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Susan Evans, Senior Specialist - Science, Research and Innovation, WWF-Canada

Session:

What’s Measured – Using Indicators to Measure Progress and Change Courses: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Graham Fisher, Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Affairs, Government of Province of Nova Scotia

Session:

Lessons learned from the Municipal Climate Chance Action Plan Process in Nova Scotia: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Rebecca Francis, Continuous Improvement Manager, District Municipality of Muskoka

RFrancis pic1 (1)Rebecca Francis is a sustainability professional, practicing in both the non-profit and municipal government sectors since 2009. She specializes in public outreach, employee engagement, partnership building, and demonstrating the business case for sustainability. The Continuous Improvement Unit is a small team focused on special projects and issues identified by District Council and Senior Management. Rebecca joined the CIU in July 2016. Upcoming projects include land lease for solar developments, exploring shared services for area municipalities in Muskoka, and energy conservation measures.  Previously Rebecca served as the Sustainability Coordinator at The Town of Huntsville for nearly 5 years where her work focused on energy conservation and generation projects, active transportation and a variety of community sustainability projects.

Session:

Small Town Success Stories: Lessons Learned from Small and Rural Municipalities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Micaela Gerling, Program Coordinator, Alberta Community Resilience Program, Environment and Parks, Government of Alberta

GerlingMicaela graduated from the University of Lethbridge in 2007 with a Bachelor of Management.  Working in various capacities with the Government of Alberta since 2008, Micaela has spent the last eight years finding her passion in a milieu of unique water challenges, policies and innovations, from issue and communication management to flood recovery programing arising out of the 2013 floods.  Micaela’s most recent endeavours involve administration of multi-million dollar grant programs–she is the municipal liaison and program coordinator for the Alberta Community Resilience Program and the Flood Recovery and Erosion Control Program, working with southern Alberta communities to build resilience to flood and drought events.

Session:

Dealing with Water: Flood Preparedness Policy and Governance in Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Melanie Goodchild, Senior Counsel, Indigenous Relations at National Office, Canadian Red Cross

Session:

Exploring the Connection between Health and Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 1:30-3:00

Will Green, Manager, Air Quality and Climate Change, Halifax Regional Municipaity

Session:

The Econmics of Resilience: From Business Case to Financing: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Mark Groulx, Assistant Professor, University of Northern British Columbia

Session:

Unexpected Viewpoints: Four Fresh Perspectives on Climate Change: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Adam Hayter, Energy Specialist, Halifax Regional Municpality

Session:

Moving Towards Alternatives: Green Building Practices and Renewable Energy: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Trisha Henderson, Environmental Policy Coordinator, Town of Oakville

Trisha HendersonTrisha Henderson has been employed with the Town of Oakville in the Environmental Policy Department for over 10 years developing and implementing corporate and community environmental programs including Towards Zero Waste, Sustainable Purchasing and the town’s Clean Marine program.  Most recently Trisha’s work with the town has been focused around climate change adaptation, leading staff through the development and implementation of a climate change strategy for corpoate operations as well as supporting community preparedness and resiliency through the town’s Keep Calm and Adapt program.

Session:

From Planning to Action: Bridging the Implementation Gap: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Yuill Herbert, Founding Director, Sustainable Solutions Group

Yuill has worked as a member of Sustainability Solutions Group for over fifteen years and has worked on or led more than forty community energy and GHG plans and models across Canada. He has leading expertise on climate change mitigation and adaptation – systems modelling that incorporates energy, GHG emissions and co-benefits. Yuill serves as a director on the boards of the Canada Research Chair on Sustainable Community Development, the Canadian Worker Cooperative Federation and Tatamagouche Community Land Trust.

Session:

Lessons learned from the Municipal Climate Chance Action Plan Process in Nova Scotia: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Daniella Hirschfeld, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley

Daniella HirschfeldDaniella Hirschfeld is a PhD Candidate in Environmental Planning at UC Berkeley.  Her research focuses on climate adaptation planning and the development of resilient communities.  Prior to her current studies, Daniella worked at STAR Communities, ICLEI USA and The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to help local governments adapt to climate change and enhance their sustainability efforts.  Daniella holds a Masters of Environmental Management (MEM) from Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment and a BA from Dartmouth College.

Session:

Transformational Versus Incremental adaptation – Can We All Move Light-years Ahead? : Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Larissa Holman, Water Coordinator, Ecology Action Centre

Session:

Nature as a Vital Tool for Canadian Community Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30-1:00

Marvin Ingebrigsten, Infrastructure & Development Services Supervisor, Infrastructure Services, Engineering Division, City of Welland

Session:

Intensive – Engineering Solutions for Flood Resiliency Across Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 4:00 – 6:00

Sharyn Inward, Director of Water Programs, Green Communities Canada

Sharyn InwardSharyn has 2 decades of experience developing and implementing province-wide and nation-wide community-based environmental action programs. Her program messages have reached hundreds of thousands of people and achieved considerable environmental benefits. Sharyn’s latest work includes developing and implementing RAIN Community Solutions (addressing lot-level stormwater management in communities across Canada). Other work for Green Communities Canada has included developing Well Aware (private well stewardship), Pesticide Free Naturally and Depave Paradise. Sharyn’s programs, RAIN Community Solutions and Well Aware, have both won national and provincial awards and recognition.

Session:

From Planning to Action: Bridging the Implementation Gap: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Ewa Jackson, Manager, ICLEI - Canada

Screenshot 2016-07-27 10.46.27Ewa has worked with municipal governments for over 14 years in the fields of sustainability, public participation, and climate change. She holds degrees from the University of Toronto in environmental management and political science, and is currently pursuing her Masters in Environment and Business. In addition to managing ICLEI Canada’s operational and program activities, Ewa is project manager for many ICLEI Canada consulting activities including the current Great Lakes Climate Change Adaptation Project to help build capacity for local resilience in municipalities around Ontario.  She has worked on numerous adaptation and sustainability monitoring and evaluation projects, including those of local, national and international scope.

Ewa is a leader in the field of municipal climate adaptation and resilience. Since 2007 she has been engaging with communities from coast to coast to coast on the issue. She led the development of ICLEI’s Guidebook, Changing Climate Changing Communities, which ultimately was a 3-year process of research, collaboration and piloting with experts in the field including municipal practitioners, climate scientists, planners, disaster specialists, extension agents and academics.  Ewa’s particular field of interest is in the area of climate communications, and how effective and targeted communications can be used to move forward with the implementation of adaptive actions. She continuously works with specialists in the field to keep municipal officials at the forefront and responding to the advancements being made. She often speaks publicly on the state of municipal adaptation planning across Canada and internationally.

Session:

Fishbowl! Having the Climate Conversation: Tuesday, September 13, 9:30-11:00

Adaptation Solutions and Innovations from the South: how can Canada-South Collaboration Inform Adaptation at Larger Scales at Home: Tuesday, September 13, 4:00-6:00

Paul Kovacs, Founder and Executive Director, Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction

kovacsPaul is Founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction, Adjunct Research Professor at Western University, and CEO of the Property and Casualty Insurance Compensation Corporation.  Since 1996 Paul has been a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world’s leading forum for the study of climate issues. The Panel won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize “for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change”. He is Canada’s leading authority on insurance and climate extremes, and has been a contributing author to numerous international and Canadian reports on reducing the risk of loss from earthquakes, flood and severe wind to achieve disaster resilience.  He has written more than 200 publications and articles and is a passionate champion for insurance, disaster resilience and adaptation to climate extremes.  Paul chairs a number of working groups and is also a member of a number of Boards and Advisory Panels. He is a proud husband and father, with a growing collection of bow ties.

Session:

The Data Divide: Using Data to Enhance Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:30-11:00

Victoria Kramkowski, Stormwater Charge Program Coordinator, City of Mississauga

Dr. Victoria Kramkowski is the Stormwater Charge Program Coordinator for the City of Mississauga where she manages the City’s stormwater charge and its associated credit, subsidy and exemption programs. She also works on outreach and is coordinating the implementation of Mississauga’s upcoming stormwater home visit program. Victoria has previously worked for the provincial government and has taught, published and consulted on topics that include scenario planning, environmental assessment, forest management policy, water resources planning, urban planning and natural resources management. Victoria has a Master of Environmental Studies and Urban Planning and a Ph.D. in Environmental Planning from York University.

Session:

Innovative Practices in Paying for Stormwater Management: Monday, September 12, 1:30-3:00

Sara J. O'Neill, Senior Research Associate, Sustainable Prosperity

As a Senior Research Associate for Sustainable Prosperity (SP), a national green economy think tank/do tank based at the University of Ottawa, Sara’s research focuses on sustainable communities and in finding ways to make our cities a better place to live for everyone. After completing an Honours Bachelor degree in Biology at Queen’s University, Sara went to the University of Calgary to complete a Master of Environmental Design (Planning) degree, focusing her work on sustainable communities and how municipalities implement change in stormwater management practices. Through her work as an environmental planner for Conservation Authorities in Ontario, Sara developed a keen interest in the importance of economics and policy for on-the- ground environmental decision-making and the impacts of those decisions on communities and people. Continuing her focus on community sustainability planning, Sara completed a Master’s degree in Environmental Sustainability at the University of Ottawa, working on various projects focused on pricing signals for combatting urban sprawl, climate change policy, and environmental justice issues in city sustainability planning.

Session:

Innovative Practices in Paying for Stormwater Management: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Peter Labor, Director, Protected Areas and Ecosystems, Nova Scotia Environment

Peter Labor_2015Peter Labor has been with the Nova Scotia protected areas program for 17 years, working as regional coordinator, planner, and Director. During this time he has played a key role in identifying and advancing the protection of lands in Nova Scotia, and ensuring that they are managed to provide a range of societal benefits.  Peter has also participated in a number of national and international groups, including the Lake Superior Binational Forum, North American Water Trails, and Canadian Heritage Rivers Board, and is a facilitator for the Canadian Parks Council’s Park System Leadership Course. Prior to joining the government, Peter was active in the adventure tourism industry, as a manager, trip leader, guide, and interpreter. He is an experienced wilderness paddler and hiker, and is committed to helping future generations enjoy and appreciate wild natural areas.  Peter holds a Master’s degree in Canadian Heritage and Development Studies, a Bachelor of Science in Natural Science, and an Honours degree in Outdoor Recreation, Parks and Tourism.

Session:

Nature as a Vital Tool for Canadian Community Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Tom Lancaster, Division Manager, Planning & Analytics, Regional Planning, Metro Vancouver

Tom LancasterTom Lancaster is a planning strategist with experience in the not-for-profit sector, as local government staff, as a long-range planning consultant, First Nations planner, and in the land use development sector. His planning background ranges from working for CIDA in international development on forest renewal to regional climate change adaptation. Tom is both an urban planner and designer and has brought a rental housing highrise tower on a SkyTrain station through the approvals process to rezoning. He has started two consulting firms; Ear to the Ground Planning and Reinvention Sustainability Planning, as well as a climate focussed NGO called the Dynamic Cities Project. He is an accomplished video producer, piloting the use of video in urban planning 15 years ago. Tom has directed the public processes, and written the Official Community Plans, Neighbourhood Plans, and climate change adaptation strategies for over 15 local governments across BC, has been the Deputy Director of Planning. He has been a sessional lecturer at Universities and Colleges and has taught smart growth integrated land use and transportation planning and approvals processes to newly elected officials at Local Government Leadership Associations. Tom’s specialization in integrated land use, housing, and transportation planning led directly into his work with Health Agencies and Authorities on Healthy Built Environment planning and implementation and he has facilitated sessions on this in communities throughout BC. Tom is currently the Division Manager for Planning & Analytics for Metro Vancouver and is responsible for Regional Planning land use, utilities, and transportation data and analysis, which includes developing the Integrated Regional Climate Action Strategy that coordinates corporate operations, as well as the 23 member local governments.

Session:

Dealing with Water: Flood Preparedness Policy and Governance in Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

David Lapp, Practice Lead, Globalization and Sustainable Development , Engineers Canada

Session:

Legal Liability and Regulatory Mechanisms as Catalysts for Action on Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 10:15-1200

Vincent Leys, Coastal Engineer, CBCL Consulting

Vincent Leys is a coastal engineer with the Halifax consulting engineering firm CBCL. He is involved in infrastructure and environmental projects related to harbours, waterfronts, and adaptation to sea level rise. His work focuses on mitigating coastal impacts from extreme events on people and infrastructure, while accommodating natural processes such as sediment transport and flooding. Over the last 15 years he has contributed to a wide range of projects for climate change resilience within coastal communities in Atlantic Canada. These include infrastructure upgrades at ports and fishing harbours, the Nova Scotia State of the Coast report, recent erosion and flood mitigation plans for Truro and Mahone Bay, and adaptation guidance for coastal communities in partnership with the four Atlantic Provinces and four Universities.

Session:

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada: Issues and Responses: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Julius Lindsay, Community Energy Specialist, City of Mississauga

Julius LindsayJulius is the Community Energy Specialist at the City of Mississauga. He is currently leading the City’s community energy, and climate change adaptation and mitigation work.  Prior to joining Mississauga in 2012, he worked with Infrastructure Ontario (formerly Ontario Reality Corporation) where he worked with a wide-variety of stakeholders in implementing energy master plans, modelling and verifying greenhouse gas emissions, performing vulnerability assessments and developing a variety of corporate social responsibility and sustainability plans. Julius has a H.B.Sc in physics and math from the University of Toronto.

Session:

The Economics of Resilience: From Business Case to Financing: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Scott MacCallum, Director of Operations, Clayton Developments Limited

Session:

Role of the Private Sector in Building Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Kenda Mackenzie, Director, Regulatory Services, Halifax Water

Kenda has over 20 years’ experience in municipal engineering, graduating in 1995 from the Technical University of Nova Scotia with a Bachelor in Civil Engineering. She joined Halifax Water in 2008 and previous to that worked with Halifax Regional Municipality and CBCL Limited Consulting Engineers. In her current role as Director of the Regulatory Services Department, she is responsible for overseeing the compliance and adherence of both the Utility to its operating permits from Nova Scotia Environment and of its customer’s connections to the Utility’s infrastructure through its Rules and Regulations.  Regulatory Services works closely with the Billing Department in assessing which properties are subject to the Stormwater Charge and which ones should be exempt.   In addition, as Halifax Water finalizes changes to the rate structure to allow for a Billing Adjustment (“Credit”) Program, Regulatory Services will be involved in establishing the framework and management of the program.

Session:

Innovative Practices in Paying for Stormwater Management: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Allan Magi, Executive Director, Capital Works, City of Burlington

Session:

Intensive – Engineering Solutions for Flood Resiliency Across Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 4:00 – 6:00

Patricia Manuel, Director, School of Planning, Dalhousie University

Dr. Patricia Manuel is the Director of the School of Planning at Dalhousie University, Halifax, and is cross-appointed to the School of Occupational Therapy. She is also a visiting faculty member at the University Centre of the Westfjords, Akyureri University, Iceland in the Coastal and Marine Management program. She is a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners and the Licensed Professional Planners Association of Nova Scotia. She specializes in coastal planning, climate change adaptation planning and community design and health. Patricia serves on national and regional coastal and climate change advisory committees. She is very active with community-based groups to promote environmentally responsible land planning and development and meaningful citizen engagement.

Session: Small Town Success Stories: Lessons Learned from Small and Rural Municipalities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Curniss McGoldrick, Climate Adaptation Coordinator, The City of Thunder Bay

Curniss-bio-pictureCurniss is an experienced project coordinator and climate adaptation specialist with a background in earth sciences, stormwater management, communication, and outreach. She has spent the past three years working for the City of Thunder Bay exploring how to increase municipal resilience within existing constraints. So far, this has involved a lot of collaborative work, creative problem-solving, local knowledge integration, and priority alignment. She successfully led the development of the City’s Climate Adaptation Strategy and has positioned Thunder Bay as a leader in municipal climate change adaptation. As Climate Adaptation Coordinator in the City’s EarthCare Office, Curniss works with a wide range of stakeholders to identify adaptation opportunities and priorities for implementation. From City Managers to citizens, she brings people together with her leadership, vision, and overall enthusiasm for building community resilience. She holds a bachelor of science with honours in geology and a minor in geography from Queen’s University.

Session:

Crossing Paths: Building Partnerships to Improve Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30-1:00

Theresa McGuire, Registered Nurse and Clinical Instructor in Community Health, Dalhousie University

Theresa McGuire is a certified Occupational Health Nurse and Canadian Registered Safety Professional. Shortly after graduating as a Registered Nurse from the Victoria General Hospital in Halifax in 1988, she set off to work in Quebec, England, Ontario, BC, and New Brunswick. She is currently employed with the IWK and Nova Scotia Health Authority’s occupational health programs and sails with the Coast Guard on summer deployments to the Arctic as a Health Officer, while teaching community health at Dalhousie University’s School of Nursing during the school term.  She has recently completed a Masters in Environmental Management degree focusing on human health risks, with a final internship and report on the health effects of nature therapy.

Session:

Exploring the Connections Between Health and Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Ian McVey, Project Manager, Ontario Climate Consortium

Ian McVeyIn his role with the OCC Ian McVey works to support the development and operation of interdisciplinary partnerships that span academic, policy and practice communities.  In this role of Partnership management, Ian provides facilitation and coordination services to enable collaboration, as well as subject matter expertise on the integration of climate policy with land use and energy policy.  Ian McVey completed a Master of Environmental Studies at York University focused on environmental economics and climate change policy. He also holds a Bachelor of Commerce in International Business from Concordia University. Prior to the OCC, Ian worked in a research analyst roles with Export Development Canada, the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, Loop Initiatives, and the Pembina Institute.

Session:

What’s Measured – Using Indicators to Measure Progress and Change Courses: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Camilla Melrose, Water Program Coordinator, Clean Foundation

Camilla is the Water Program Coordinator with the Clean Foundation, in Nova Scotia, where she works on a number of projects, with most of her time spent focused on the Atlantic Stormwater Initiative. She holds a B.Sc Combined Honours in earth sciences and biology from Dalhousie University, and a M.Sc. in environmental geochemistry from the University of New Brunswick. Camilla has been working in the environmental sector in the Maritime Provinces for the past 15 years, including with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the NB Department of Natural Resources, working on habitat mapping and conservation area prioritization, and as an environmental consultant, working mostly on marine projects. Her main interests are in protecting our freshwater resources, and in finding solutions to environmental challenges that solve multiple problems at the same time.

Session:

Blue-Green Cities: Integrating Water Management with Urban Green Space: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Shannon Miedema, Manager, Energy & Environment, Halifax Regional Municipality

Shannon Miedema is the Energy and Environment Program Manager for the Halifax Regional Municipality.  Shannon has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies and Earth Systems Science from Queen’s University, a Master of Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Kings College. After five years in environmental consulting, she joined the municipality in 2009 as an Environmental Performance Officer focused on climate change mitigation and adaptation. Shannon plans to continue using her passion, education and experience to lead Halifax towards increased resiliency and sustainability for the betterment of our community, economy and environment.

Session:

The Economics of Resilience: From Business Case to Financing: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Natalia Moudrak, Director of Natural Infrastructure Adaptation Program, Intact Centre on Climate Change Adaptation

Natalia-Moudrak-headshotNatalia’s experience ranges from sustainability strategy, operationalization, reporting and business case development across a wide range of industry sectors and client organizations. Natalia has a B.A in Economics and a Masters in Urban Planning from the University of Waterloo. In her role as Director of Natural Infrastructure Adaptation Program at the Intact Centre on Climate Change Adaptation, Natalia is responsible for overseeing programs that help communities across Canada reduce the risk of flooding through three areas of focus: 1) flood-resilient community design, 2) flood reduction through natural infrastructure and 3) investigating the business case for climate adaptation in the financial services sector.

Session:

Dealing with Water: Flood Preparedness Policy and Governance in Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

David Murray, Principal, Water Resources Engineer, Kerr Wood Leidal, and National President, Canadian Water Resources Association

Session:

Blue-Green Cities: Integrating Water Management with Urban Greenspace: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00-3:30

Edward Nichol, Senior Researcher, Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT)

Edward PhotoEdward Nichol is a Senior Researcher for the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT) at Simon Fraser University. At ACT, Edward is engaged in a variety of research projects related to ecosystem health, sustainable planning, and climate change action in Canada. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from McMaster University in Geography and Environmental Studies, and a C.I.P. accredited Masters in Environmental Studies degree from York University. Edward was the lead author on ACT’s most recent report, Low Carbon Resilience: Transformative Climate Change Planning for Canada, which outlines the environmental, social, economic, and health benefits that can be achieved by combining climate mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Session:

The Economics of Resilience: From Business Case to Financing: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Finding the Synergies between Low-carbon and Resilient Communities: Monday, September 12, 3:30-5:30

Peter Nimmrichter, Associate and Climate Change Specialist, Water Resources, Amec Foster Wheeler

Session:

Assisting Municipalities in Combatting Extreme Rainfall: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00 The Data Divide: Working with Data to Enhance Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00 Intensive – Engineering Solutions for Flood Resiliency Across Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 4:00 – 6:00

Alain Normand, Manager, Emergency Management Office, City of Brampton

Session:  To be determined.

Emily O'Donnel, Research Fellow, Geographical Sciences, University of Nottingham

Emily O'DonnellEmily O’Donnell PhD M.Sci (Hons.) is an early career Research Fellow in flood risk management at the University of Nottingham and lead researcher and project coordinator on the multi-disciplinary, multi-institution EPSRC funded project “Evaluating the multiple benefits of flood risk strategies in Blue-Green Cities” and associated “Clean Water for All” initiative (a UK-US-China collaboration). Emily’s current research focuses on identifying the un-certainties and challenges that act as barriers to the widespread implementation of Blue-Green sustainable flood risk management solutions, the evaluation of the multiple social and environmen-tal benefits of blue-green infrastructure using GIS, and stakeholder engagement practices. Emily is working closely with local government stakeholders in Newcastle, UK, and Portland, USA, to develop a sustainable vision for urban surface water and flood risk management via Learning and Action Alliances. Emily is currently leading a project with Northumbrian Water Ltd. to rigorously evaluate the multiple benefits of sustainable drainage using complex ArcGIS models and Excel toolkits, and will start work on a new project ‘Urban Flood Resilience in an Uncertain Future’ in Sept 2016 (funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council).

Session:

Blue-Green Cities: Integrating Water Management with Urban Green Space: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Shawna Peddle, Director, Partners for Action

shawna peddleShawna has 17 years of experience in the environmental field, managing environmental assessment and aboriginal and public engagement programs for infrastructure and energy projects throughout Ontario. That experience allowed her to engage with local municipal governments, aboriginal communities, and residents on a number of often contentious projects. As the Director for Partners for Action, Shawna is responsible for strategic oversight of all P4A programs (events, research, reports, etc.), fundraising, managing relationships with stakeholders, funders and research partners, and promoting the network.

Session:

Dealing with Water: Flood Preparedness Policy and Governance in Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Joanne Perdue, Chief Sustainability Officer, University of Calgary

Session:

Unexpected Viewpoints: Four Fresh Perspectives on Climate Change: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Jon Philipsborn, Director, Climate Adaptation Practice, AECOM

Mr. Philipsborn currently serves as Climate Adaptation Practice Director for Americas in AECOM’s Environment Business Line. He advises clients on the strategic integration of climate change into planning, project development, and management decisions. This has included supporting public and private sector clients with disaster preparedness and resilience planning; understanding climate vulnerability and identifying and implementing adaptation strategies. Throughout his career, Mr. Philipsborn has worked on innovative projects that produce environmental, economic, and community benefits. Mr. Philipsborn has a Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a BA from Kenyon College.

Session:

Role of the Private Sector in Building Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00 Transformational Versus Incremental Adaptation – Can We All Move Light-years Ahead?: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Patrick Regan, Professor and Associate Director, Notre Dame- Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN)

May 6, 2016; Pat Regan - Keough School. (Photo by Barbara Johnston/University of Notre Dame)Patrick Regan researches the impact of climate change and social adaptation on armed conflict. His most recent book, The Politics of Global Climate Change (Paradigm, 2015), articulates a multi-level political process for influencing climate change legislation, beginning with local politics.  A core faculty member of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, Regan also studies the role of external actors in managing armed conflict.  In February 2016, Regan was appointed Associate Director of the University of Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative for ND-GAIN (Notre Dame Global Adaptation Initiative), a university effort that seeks to understand the effects of climate change though a lens of human social adaptation and advise private industry and nongovernmental organizations develop adaptation strategies.

Session:

What’s Measured – Using Indicators to Measure Progress and Change Courses: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Carolyn Rennie, Managing Director, Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc.

FullSizeRenderCarolyn Rennie is the Managing Director for Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ). Over the past two years, Carolyn has managed the daily operations of CatIQ including reporting on natural & man-made catastrophes within Canada using GIS and meteorological tools, surveying the insurance industry on associated losses, and monitoring weather on the comprehensive CatIQ platform (www.catiq.com). Carolyn also organizes CatIQ’s Canadian Catastrophe Conference (C4) which brings together industry, academia and government to discuss Canadian natural and man-made catastrophes to foster collaborations before, during and after catastrophic events. Before joining CatIQ, Carolyn worked as a Physical Scientist for the Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada. Carolyn studied Atmospheric Science at York University attaining an Honours Bachelor of Science, a Certificate in Meteorology and a Certificate in GIS and Remote Sensing in 2012. In 2015 she finalized her Masters of Science in Earth & Space Science at York University focusing on Radar Meteorology. Carolyn is an outdoor enthusiast whose passions include severe weather, GIS, and research.

Session:

Crossing Paths: Building Partnerships to Improve Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Gregory Richardson, Policy Analyst, Climate Change and Innovation Bureau, Health Canada

Gregory Richardson is a Policy Analyst in the Climate Change and Innovation Bureau at Health Canada (Government of Canada) where he works with Canadian communities to reduce the urban heat island effect and improve indoor and outdoor thermal comfort. He’s supported six pilot communities across Canada with developing plans, actions and decision-support tools to help reduce the urban heat island effect. Gregory is a Registered Professional Planner in Ontario and a Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners. In addition to his efforts working directly with communities, he’s authored various articles and reports describing how cities can adapt to climate change.

Session:

Exploring the Connections Between Health and Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 1:30- 3:30

Holly Richardson, Policy Coordinator, Parks and Recreation, Halifax Regional Municipality

Session:

Nature as a Vital Tool in Canadian Community Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30-1:00

Jonas Roberts, Climate Change Consultant, Amec Foster Wheeler

Jonas Roberts is a Climate Change Consultant with Amec Foster Wheeler’s Met-Ocean Services group. In this role, he investigates the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on communities, infrastructure, and energy projects. Jonas obtained his PhD from Memorial University’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science where he focused on the impacts of climate change on hydropower in Labrador. He has a master’s and a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and previous work experience in the construction, manufacturing and energy industries.  Jonas sits on PEGNL’s Environment Committee where he leads their Climate Change Subcommittee. He is also a member of the Newfoundland and Labrador Environmental Industry Association’s Policy Committee and Municipality Newfoundland and Labrador’s Environment and Sustainability Committee.

Session:

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada: Issues and Responses: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00

Barbara Robinson, President, Norton Engineering

Barbara CUBs gameBarbara Robinson, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., established Norton Engineering Inc. in 2015 following a successful private sector career and highlighted recently by two years as City Engineer for Kitchener. Ms. Robinson has 26 years’ experience in all aspects of the study, assessment, evaluation, design, construction and post-construction monitoring of municipal infrastructure, with a focus on sanitary sewers in particular.  Ms. Robinson has extensive experience in private side I/I identification, and performed house to house drainage surveys, lateral camera inspection (launched from the house), and used CCTV, smoke & dye testing and flow monitoring on dozens of projects across Ontario.  She has undertaken the design and construction of CIPP lining projects, MH rehabilitation projects, jack and bore and open cut construction projects. She is passionate about using our limited resources to work together with clients to deliver excellence in engineering effectively and efficiently.  Ms. Robinson works as an infrastructure columnist with CBC Radio, speaking on a wide range of infrastructure and engineering issues from sewers to potholes to funding programs, both in Kitchener and across Ontario.

Session:

Assisting Municipalities in Combatting Extreme Rainfall: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Lara Ryan, Regional Director, Canada Green Building Council

Lara Ryan is the Regional Director – Atlantic Chapter, of the Canada Green Building Council. In this role she works with the organization’s senior management team and the local leadership board to advance the adoption of green building practices in Atlantic Canada though networking, education and advocacy.  Prior to assuming this role full time, Lara was a consultant specializing in corporate social responsibility. Creating and executing strategies on employee engagement, community investment and environmental sustainability is her particular area of expertise. She has been part time faculty at Mount St. Vincent University and for four years wrote a column on corporate social responsibility for Progress Magazine. Besides a B.A from the University of King’s College and a BPR from Mount Saint Vincent University, she also holds a Certificate in Corporate Social Responsibility from the Conference Board of Canada and the University of St. Michael’s College.

Session:

Moving to Alternatives – Green Building Practices and Renewable Energy: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30-1:00 

Dan Sandink, Manager, Resilient Communities and Research, Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction

D SandinkDan Sandink joined the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR) in 2006 and is currently Director of Research. ICLR was established by Canada’s property and casualty (P&C) insurance industry as an independent, not-for-profit natural disaster mitigation research institute affiliated with Western University. Since joining ICLR, Dan has led a significant portion of the Institute’s urban flood risk reduction work, and he has authored or co-authored dozens of reports and articles on topics related to urban flooding. Dan’s writing has focused on public risk perceptions, adoption of lot-level basement flood risk reduction practices, insurance, climate change, lot-level flood protection technologies, inflow/infiltration, construction code development, interpretation and enforcement, among many other topics. Dan is a graduate of the geography and planning programs at the universities of Guelph, Western Ontario and Toronto.

Session:

Assisting Municipalities in Combatting Extreme Rainfall: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

David Sauchyn, Professor, University of Regina, and Researcher, Prairie Adaptation Research Collective

Dave-SauchynDr. David Sauchyn is Research Professor at the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative at the University of Regina. His main research interests are 1) the climate and hydrology of the past millennium in Canada’s western interior and how knowledge of the past can inform scenarios of future climate and water supplies, and 2) planned adaption to mitigate the impacts of climate change. He has authored or co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, books and book chapters, including as lead author of “The New Normal: The Canadian Prairies in a Changing Climate”. David recently co-directed a five-year interdisciplinary study of the vulnerability of agricultural communities to climate extremes in Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Brazil and the Canadian Prairies. He has given more than 350 invited public and professional talks on climate change.

Session:

Engaging the “Unusual Suspects” in Canadian Adaptation: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Ron Scheckenberger, Principal Water Resources, Amec Foster Wheeler

Session:

Intensive – Engineering Solutions for Flood Resiliency Across Canada: Tuesday, September 13, 4:00 – 6:00

Stephen Sheppard, Director, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning

Stephen SheppardDr. Sheppard (ASLA) is a Professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, where he directs the Urban Forestry program and heads CALP, a research group that works with communities on climate change solutions. He has over 30 years experience in environmental planning and community engagement. His latest book Visualizing Climate Change summarizes research and best practice on using visual media, such as 3D visualization and videogames, to foster low-carbon, attractive resilient communities.

Session:

Transformational Versus Incremental Adaptation – Can We All Move Light-years Ahead?: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Ben Themens, Director, Lonsdale Energy Coroporation

Ben ThemensSince 2003, Ben Themens has been holding dual roles at the City of North Vancouver. Ben currently is Director of Finance of the City as well as Executive Director of the Lonsdale Energy Corporation (LEC). LEC is a wholly-owned City corporation that provides energy for space heating and cooling and domestic hot water to over 60 buildings in the City of North Vancouver.  Ben combines expertise in financial management, engineering and project management in his roles with the City. In addition to being an accredited Professional Engineer and Chartered Professional Accountant (CGA), Ben holds an MBA as well as a Post-Graduate Diploma in Management for the Asia Pacific Region. Ben has worked at all levels of government (municipal, regional, provincial and federal) as well as within various private organizations.

Session:

Finding the Synergies Between Low-carbon and Resilient Communities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

Terry Thibodeau, Renewable Energy Program Coordinator, Digby, NS

Session:

Lessons learned from the Municipal Climate Chance Action Plan Process in Nova Scotia: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Barbara Turley-McIntyre, Vice President, Sustainability and Citizenship, The Co-operators

Barbara Turley-McIntyreBarbara started her business career as an independent insurance broker in Montreal and in 1997 joined The Co-operators Group Limited, a $42 billion Canadian-owned, multi-product insurance and financial services company. She managed underwriting teams in property and casualty and held responsible for community and shareholder relations. Presently, Barbara leads the enterprise-wide integration of the Sustainability Vision, Policy and Strategy with responsibility for producing the annual Integrated Report and carbon management programs.  This also includes responsibility for The Co-operators community programs, including The Co-operators Foundation.  Barabara hold a Masters in Environment and Business from the University of Waterloo and a Chartered Insurance Professional designation. She is a Sessional Lecturer at the University of Waterloo, Faculty of the Environment. Her volunteering activities include organizations that advance sustainable development – Director with The Natural Step Canada and a Board member of the United Nations Environment Program – Finance Initiative Global Steering Committee and the Principles of Sustainable Insurance.

Session:

Role of the Private Sector in Building Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Brennan Vogel, PhD Candidate, Western University

Session:

Lessons learned from the Municipal Climate Chance Action Plan Process in Nova Scotia: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00 – 3:30

Anita Walker, Manager, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

Anita Walker is the Manager of the Climate Change Adaptation Program at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. She has been working on the climate change file for most of her 15 years with the federal government, starting at Health Canada and moving to the Indigenous file in 2009. She has also worked on sustainable development issues and environmental management on-reserve. She is currently developing a new program to support First Nations as they address climate change needs. She has a Masters of Environmental Studies from the University of Waterloo.

Session:

Unexpected Viewpoints: Four Fresh Perspectives on Climate Change: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40-11:00

Dr. Gaynor Watson-Creed, Medical Officer of Health, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Central Zone

Gaynor Watson-CreedDr. Watson-Creed is a native of PEI and graduated from Dalhousie Medical School in 1999. She completed residency programs in both Family Medicine and then in the specialty of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (formerly Community Medicine) at McMaster University and returned to the Maritimes in 2005 as Medical Officer of Health for the Nova Scotia Health Authority, Central Zone (Halifax, West Hants, Windsor). She holds an adjunct professor appointment within the Departments of Clinical Health and Epidemiology, Family Medicine, and the School of Graduate Studies at Dalhousie University, and an appointment at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at University of Toronto. She holds a BSc and MSc in Biochemistry but insists that her bench days are long behind her. Although she has a full time job outside the home, she considers her “real” full time job to be “Mom”, and her children affectionately call her “diarrhea doc.” Dr. Watson-Creed is currently a member of the Regional Plan review committee (CDAC) for Halifax, the One Nova Scotia Coalition, and several national public and population health advisory councils. She and her family reside in Dartmouth.

Session:

Exploring the Connections Between Health and Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Tony Wright, General Manager, FORCE

wrightTony Wright is the general manager of the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE). Located in the Bay of Fundy’s Minas Passage, home to the world’s highest tides, FORCE is Canada’s lead test facility for in-stream tidal energy technology. With over 24 years of combined marine related technical and operational experience, Mr. Wright leads a small team working in FORCE’s high flow environment to conduct research, build marine infrastructure, deploy monitoring equipment, and support safe tidal turbine demonstration. Prior to assuming the role of general manager, Tony served as FORCE’s director of marine operations, and before that as a naval engineering officer in the the Royal Canadian Navy, holding a variety of technical and leadership roles both onboard Canadian vessels and ashore, in financial management, major ship repair projects, technical training and education. He holds a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Royal Military College Kingston) and an MBA (Saint Mary’s University).

Session:

Moving Towards Alternatives: Green Building Practices and Renewable Energy: Tuesday, September 13, 11:30 – 1:00

Carl Yates, General Manager, Halifax Water

Yates_C_19_B_Carl Yates has extensive experience in the water utility profession having served as Project Engineer, Chief Engineer and General Manager of the Halifax Water Commission from 1988 to 1996.  In 1996, he was appointed General Manager of the Halifax Regional Water Commission which assumed a regional mandate after the municipal amalgamation of the greater Halifax area in 1996.  In 2007, Mr. Yates oversaw the formation of the first regulated water, wastewater and stormwater utility in Canada with the transfer of wastewater and stormwater assets from Halifax Municipality.  Halifax Water is a body corporate municipal utility, generating approximately 130 million dollars in annual revenue with assets of over $2 Billion. Mr. Yates is Chair of the Focus Area Council of the Water Research Foundation, a Board member of the Canadian Water Network, and a member of the Board of Directors of Special Olympics Nova Scotia.

Session:

Blue-Green Cities: Integrating Water Management with Urban Greenspace: Tuesday, September 13, 2:00-3:30

Jackie Yip, PhD Candidate, School of Community and Regional Planning, UBC

Jackie Yip is a PhD candidate at the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. Her research models and evaluate the socio-economic impact of sea-level rise in the City of Vancouver under a wide range of future scenarios. To support adaptation and risk reduction efforts more broadly, she is also leading the development of an online tool to support collaboration and sharing of lessons learnt about climate adaptation practices between 50 municipalities in the Strait of Georgia. More recently, under partnership between Fraser Health and Health Emergency Management BC, Jackie is conducting the first assessment of health care facilities’ resilience to extreme events in the Lower Mainland. The assessment serves as a critical component to the development of a climate resilience and adaptation program for health care facilities in the Lower Mainland.  Before moving to Vancouver, she was actively involved with the United Nations University’s Institute for Water, Environment, and Health; completed her MSc in Meteorology in Montreal; and BSc in Environmental Sciences in South Africa.

Session:

The Data Divide: Working with Data to Enhance Resilience: Tuesday, September 13, 9:40 – 11:00

Laura Zizzo, Founder and CEO, Zizzo Strategies Inc.

Laura Zizzo is a lawyer and strategic advisor with over a decade of experience leading organizations towards a low-carbon and climate-adapted future through the application of law and policy.  Laura started her legal career with a prominent Bay Street law firm before founding the first law firm in Canada focused on climate change in 2009. In 2015 she founded a strategic consultancy focused on advising public and private sector clients on climate risks. She is a frequent writer and speaker on the move to the low-carbon economy and has become a leading voice on the legal imperative to adapt to climate change. Laura has contributed to numerous research and policy papers on legal liability related to climate change adaptation, the use of existing legal mechanisms to address climate change, and the role of markets and flexibility mechanisms in driving emissions reductions.  Laura has worked in the strategic research division of the Ontario Ministry of Finance and as co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of International Law and International Relations. She is co-founder of the Climate Change Lawyers Network, a member of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) committee on Environmental Law, an executive member of the Ontario Bar Association’s Environmental Law section and is a volunteer presenter for The Climate Reality Project. She has a degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Waterloo and a law degree from the University of Toronto. Laura is called to the Bar of Ontario.

Session:

Legal Liability and Regulatory Mechanisms as Catalysts for Action on Climate Change: Monday, September 12, 10:15 – 12:00 Assisting Municipalities in Combatting Extreme Rainfall: Monday, September 12, 1:30 – 3:00

Ryan Zizzo, Technical Director, Zizzo Strategies Inc.

Ryan HeadshotRyan has worked on over 50 green building and neighbourhood projects  with leading Canadian and European architects, developers, and property management firms (including over 30 LEED projects). He gained this unique experience through his previous position as a project manager at the leading green engineering firm Halsall Associates (now WSP) in Toronto and through three years working in the cutting-edge Nordic green building scene in Helsinki, Finland operating through his own consultancy, ZED Consulting.  In addition, he developed and delivered graduate level courses in Sustainable Building Engineering at Helsinki’s Metropolia University of Applied Science and provided professional development training through the Green Building Professional education series in six European countries.  Ryan sits on the Technical Advisory Board for the Toronto-based Project Neutral, which focuses on improving the sustainability of neighourhoods, and is a regular contributor and speaker at Canadian Green Building Council events.  Ryan holds a Masters degree in Applied Science in Civil Engineering and Environmental Engineering from the University of Toronto, is a licenced Engineer in the Province of Ontario, and holds a LEED Accredited Professional designation in Neighbourhood Development.

Session:

Finding the Synergies Between Low-carbon and Resilient Communities: Monday, September 12, 3:30 – 5:30

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The 2016 Livable Cities Forum will have a diversity of speakers representing local governments and climate change adaptation experts from across Canada. Experts from industry, business, academia, and the NGO community will highlight how they are working to build resilient communities.
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